Mysteries of the Occult

19, Magician, Mystic, Transhumanist, Anarchist, Stoner.

If you have questions, or would like to chat, my ask box is always open.

That post I wrote up about determinism earlier, the way I wound up phrasing the end of it got me thinking about the law of liberty in a different way than I previously understood it. The book of the law states that your True Will is in accordance with the Will of Nuit, correct? Nuit being the Egyptian sky goddess, infinite space, the all; associating Nuit with the physical universe would mean that an individual’s True Will is the Will of the universe.

So if my deterministic worldview is correct, we do nothing but our Will. In that case, the law of liberty isn’t a law in the sense that it’s something you have to obey, but rather a law in the more scientific usage of the word, like the law of gravity.This would place that law in very a different light than i’ve seen it portrayed.

As long as I’m not stretching things in order to fit my worldview (which I could be haha), I think this is pretty interesting. Any thoughts on this?

I am a hard determinist, 

Free will is an illuuuuuusion. The only reason I am typing this post is because it is the result of a chain of cause and effect going back to the beginning of the universe.

In the beginning there was hydrogen. As the energy and matter of the universe expanded, the velocity and location of each atom of hydrogen determined where and when it would collect to form stars. Within these massive fusion reactors, we get the heavier elements.

As these elements are ejected from dying stars, the right combination of elements and compounds came together near Sol to form the earth. In the primordial seas, these compounds eventually form in the right combination to form single cellular life.

Life, according to the theory of evolution, adapts over time to better suit it’s environment. It was because of the nature of our planet that the chain of evolution eventually resulted in homo sapiens. If anything had been different, it’s not likely that humanity would even exist.

These external conditions that allowed the elements to form, that allowed humanity to evolve, dictate our every action. endorphins, dopamine, seratonin, and all of our other wonderful neurotransmitters are released in accordance with our environment, effecting our moods and how we react to that external stimuli. 

It’s true, you could have stayed home instead of going to work last week, but would you have? Think about the last decision you wish you had made differently; taking into account all of the factors influencing your decision, would it really be possible to have done anything else?

If you believe that God created all of this, the same factors still apply due to how we were created, the only other variable is God’s will. You can say that we were created with freewill, but were we really? or are we simply slaves to an infinite chain of cause and effect?

Obviously all of that is very oversimplified for the sake of keeping this post from getting too long, but i’m sure it gets my point across. I would love to believe in freewill, and sometimes I find myself believing that it exists; but when I sit down to think about it, it doesn’t even seem possible.

When I first came to that conclusion, it was depressing. How can life have any meaning if we don’t even really make any decisions? What is the point in doing anything if we are all just slaves to causality? But now I find it freeing. Why worry when the outcome of every situation is predetermined? I marvel at the directions things take, and watch as the universe unfolds itself before me. We live, love, and feel in accordance with the movement of all things. To fight it is futile, as trying to fight against the current is only possible in accordance to that same current. Regardless of whether it is the will of God that determines our actions, or the will of the cosmos, it is not something to be reviled or held in contempt for robbing us of freedom, but something to understand and be in accordance with.

It is my personal opinion, that believing otherwise will only bring suffering, as we regret our inevitable failures and missed opportunities, when really it all happens exactly how it is supposed to. Freedom is knowing that nothing will happen in a way that is not perfect and in accordance with the will of the universe. We are all a product of that will, that chain of causality, and we do nothing but that will.

It is a thousand times better to make every kind of mistake than to slide into the habit of hesitation, of uncertainty, of indecision.

—Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears (via elektrik667)

(Source: sublimesea, via elektrik667)

gnothyself:

biblioplasm:

The Lost Keys of Freemasonry by Manly P. Hall

found it for buck at a flea market. I hope that it’s actual signature.

I still can’t believe this. so lucky!

Much has been said of the loneliness of wisdom, and how much the Truth seeker becomes a pilgrim wandering from star to star. To the ignorant, the wise man is lonely because he abides in distant heights of the mind. But the wise man himself does not feel lonely. Wisdom brings him nearer to life; closer to the heart of the world than the foolish man can ever be. Bookishness may lead to loneliness, and scholarship may end in a battle of beliefs, but the wise man gazing off into space sees not an emptiness, but a space full of life, truth, and law.

—Manly P. Hall (via gnothyself)

mymagicalstudy:

Lately I have had the need to write more and more hebrew, and so far i have been struggling to make it look perfect with a ball point pen. However, I have been wondering if it would be easier to write with a calligraphy pen.  So, yesterday, when I went to the shops, I bought this pen. It was $5, which I thought was reasonable as most of the pens I buy for school are about $4.
What you see above is a just a rough penning of the Hebrew alphabet (I still have a while to go before I get my letters perfect…I still need some more practice). This took me less than a minute to do!
Personally, I think that’s pretty awesome! So, if you need to write hebrew, my recommendation is BUY THIS PEN! it’s amazingly heavenly to write with.

I might have to get one of these.

mymagicalstudy:

Lately I have had the need to write more and more hebrew, and so far i have been struggling to make it look perfect with a ball point pen. However, I have been wondering if it would be easier to write with a calligraphy pen.
So, yesterday, when I went to the shops, I bought this pen. It was $5, which I thought was reasonable as most of the pens I buy for school are about $4.

What you see above is a just a rough penning of the Hebrew alphabet (I still have a while to go before I get my letters perfect…I still need some more practice). This took me less than a minute to do!

Personally, I think that’s pretty awesome! So, if you need to write hebrew, my recommendation is BUY THIS PEN! it’s amazingly heavenly to write with.

I might have to get one of these.

abbath03:

Zeus: “Ah how shameless—the way these mortals blame the gods.
From us alone, they say, come all their miseries, yes,
but they themselves, with their own reckless ways,
compound their pains beyond their proper share.” -The Odyssey I. 37-40

(via holy-mountaineering)

I’d rather be in the mountains thinking of God, than in church thinking about the mountains.

—John Muir (via astranemus)

(via kushl0rd)